Channeling Your Inner Light

An attempt at more blogging, but this happened in the meantime, which is why you might find some of tweets below to be from a few months ago. 😉

A topic of discussion that comes up every now and then between programmers, technical artists and lighting artists is the concept of light masking, or Lighting Channels, and whether this concept is still valid. I’ve had this discussion many times before with developers out there (and somehow I’m sure you have too). Artists and programmers alike, opinions diverge. To get a new sample on the matter I decided to ask the twitter-verse:

LightChannels0
Light Channels – Yay or Ney (Twitter Poll) Continue reading “Channeling Your Inner Light”

Finding Next-Gen – Part I – The Need For Robust (and Fast) Global Illumination in Games

Figure 1: Direct and Indirect Illumination from a single directional light source. [1]

This post is part of the series “Finding Next-Gen“. Original version on 2015/11/08. Liveblogging, because opinions evolve over time.

Global Illumination?

Global illumination (GI) is a family of algorithms used in computer graphics that simulate how light interacts and transfers between objects in a scene. With its roots in the Light Transport Theory (the mathematics behind energy, how it transfers between various media, and leads to visibility), GI takes into account both the light that comes directly from a light source (direct lighting/illumination), as well as how this light is reflected by and onto other surfaces (indirect lighting/illumination).

As seen in Figure 1, global illumination greatly increases the visual quality of a scene by providing a rich, organic and physically convincing simulation of light. Rather than solely depending on a manual (human) process to achieve the desired look, the mathematics behind GI allow lighting artists to create visually convincing scenes without having to worry about how they can manually replicate the complexity behind effects such as light scattering, color bleeding, or other visuals that are difficult to represent artistically using only direct illumination.

Continue reading “Finding Next-Gen – Part I – The Need For Robust (and Fast) Global Illumination in Games”

Finding Next-Gen: Index

It’s Been Awhile…

It’s been a while since I posted something here. Life and being busy building a team and new graphics technology for a new game at WB Games Montréal is my excuse. But you’re right, it’s no excuse and I need to spend more time blogging. Hopefully this should get me to share more, which I definitely miss doing. So here’s my attempt. 😉

This is the index page for a series of blog posts I’m currently writing about some challenges in real-time rendering and my perspective on these topics.

In no way is this an attempt to sum it all up or provide perfect solutions, but rather add to the discussion on topics that are close and resonate with me, while respecting my various NDAs. What you will find here is undeniably inspired and fueled by the various presentations and discussions from the latest conferences, as well as from various discussions where graphics programmers tend to hang out. The following wouldn’t be possible without this amazing community of developers that share on a daily basis – thanks to everyone for the inspiration and for always sharing your discoveries and opinions! Much needed for progress.

Also, this page will most likely evolve and change. Some topics might appear, be grouped, and some might greatly change pending on how much content I can put together. Feel free to come back and check  this page over time.

Please leave comments if need be, and thanks for reading!

Finding Next-Gen

Deformable Snow and DirectX 11 in Batman: Arkham Origins

It’s been a while, but I finally found some time for a quick post to regroup the presentations I’ve done this year at the Game Developers Conference (GDC) and NVIDIA’s GPU Technology Conference (GTC). These presentations showcase and explain some of the features developed for Batman: Arkham Origins.

Continue reading “Deformable Snow and DirectX 11 in Batman: Arkham Origins”

Blending Normal Maps?

What is the best way to blend two normal maps together? Why can’t I just add two normal maps together in Photoshop? I heard that to combine two normals together, you need to add the positive components and subtract the negative components, then renormalize. Looks right to me… Why shouldn’t I be using Overlay (or a series of Photoshop blend modes) to blend normal maps together? I want to add detail to surfaces. How does one combine normal maps in real-time so that the detail normal map follows the topology described by the base normal map?

If this is something you’ve heard before, something you’ve asked yourself, check out this article, written together with Stephen Hill (@self_shadow) on the topic of blending normal maps.

Continue reading “Blending Normal Maps?”

Approximating Translucency – Part II (addendum to GDC 2011 talk / GPU Pro 2 article)

Thanks to everyone who attended my GDC talk! Was quite happy to see all those faces I hadn’t seen in a while, as well as meet those whom I only had contact with via Twitter, IM or e-mail.

For those who contacted me post-GDC, it seems the content I submitted for GPU Pro 2 didn’t make it into the final samples archive. I must’ve submitted too late, or it didn’t make it to the editor. Either way, the code in the paper is the most up-to-date, so you should definitely check-it out (and/or simply buy the book)!

Roger Cordes sent the following questions. I want to share the answers, since it covers most of the questions people had after the talk:

Continue reading “Approximating Translucency – Part II (addendum to GDC 2011 talk / GPU Pro 2 article)”

GDC 2011 – Approximating Translucency for a Fast, Cheap and Convincing Subsurface Scattering Look

As presented at GDC 2011, here’s my (and the legendary Marc Bouchard) talk on our real-time approximation of translucency, featured in the Frostbite 2 engine (used for DICE’s Battlefield 3). These are the slides that we presented, along with audio. Enjoy! 🙂

 

 

Marc and I would like to thank the following people for their time, reviews and constant support:

For those we managed to meet, we had such a good time with all of you at GDC. Always happy to interact with passionate game developers – this is what makes our industry so great! We hope to see you soon again! 🙂